Gillette has strengthened its image by taking a stand on "toxic masculinity" in its new advertising campaign


Committed ads appeal to consumers and employees alike To use

The Economist

To say that men should abstain from violence and sexual harassment is not particularly scandalous. But the new advertisement for Gillette razors has recently had its quarter of an hour of viral glory taking a stand against "toxic masculinity".

Of course, Gillette knew and wanted some Conservatives to explode with anger. The bet was that the controversy would generate free advertising that would compensate for lost sales, those customers who want a razor, and not a lesson in morality.

"The bet was that the controversy would generate free advertising that would compensate for lost sales, those customers who want a razor, not a lesson in morals"

The same strategy worked well for Nike last year with its publicity with Colin Kaepernick, an American football player dismissed for kneeling during the national anthem, to protest the racism of the US police. Some conservatives burned their Nike shoes, but the stock price quickly rebounded and Nike's sales increased. The millennials showed that they were more than happy to buy shoes that angered President Donald Trump.

Nike's customers are more accustomed to tinged advertising than those of […]

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